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2017 AHEPPP Educational Programs

KEYNOTE: RESILIENCY FOR SUCCESS
Dr. Greg Eells, Cornell University

ASSESSING OURSELVES AND OUR FAMILIES: SURVEYS AND FINDINGS FROM TWO LARGE PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES
Nancy Stephens, University of Kentucky
Laci Weeden, Georgia Institute of Technology

Who are the parents and families we are serving? Are we effectively meeting their needs? These are the questions that drive our daily work. Come hear about the survey instruments used by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Kentucky that help answer those questions. Learn about survey findings from the last few years and what trends have developed in that time. Share your assessment best practices and whether these trends are also true of your parent/family populations.

BEST PRACTICES IN SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
Stephanie Benson-Gonzales, University of Wisconsin-Madison
This session will address how Parent/Family Programs can best use social media, with a foucs on Facebook Pages and Groups. As our program turns ten years old, we have gathered the best practices we’ve learned along the way, including: where to begin, content strategy, social marketing, brand identity, account management and crisis communication.

BOLD COLLABORATIONS: INSTITUTIONS ENGAGING PARENTS AS PARTNERS FOR FIRST-YEAR SUCCESS
Laurie Hazard and Stephanie Carter, Bryant University
Both higher education officials and parents of new college students struggle with the extent to which parents should be involved in the college experience, particularly during the first year. While research on helicopter parenting suggests parents should back off, other evidence concludes that students are more successful with parental support. In fact, lack of family support can create barriers to college completion. Some universities welcome parental involvement while others view collaborating with parents as caving to their demands. This session provides a framework and resources for institutions to constructively educate parents about the key transition issues during the first-year, and in turn, support their students from a healthy distance.

BRUIN FAMILY INSIGHTS: ADAPTING THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD TO ENHANCE PROBLEM-SOLVING PROCESSES
Kayla Albano and Alexandra Brown, University of California - Los Angeles
This session will provide attendees with a tangible approach to identifying and solving specific programmatic problems using an adapted version of the scientific method. Whether individuals are trying to identify ways to start a new program or enhance an existing one, this method will help anyone identify and solve for problems and constraints while also establishing supporting data via research and assessment. The presenters will outline the process currently used at UCLA Parent & Family programs, provide a key example of implementation in a successful and highly collaborative programmatic effort, and allow attendees space to work through their own programmatic challenges using this method.
Additional worksheet

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE COMPETENT PROFESSIONAL
Emily Parker, University of Tennessee
This session will explore Characteristics of the Competent Professional in Higher Education with the purpose of encouraging participants to Be Bold in their knowledge, Be Inspired by others and to Be Here in their roles when they return to campus and as individuals. 

CELEBRATING LEGACIES & CREATING OUT OF STATE FANS DURING FAMILY WEEKEND
Ryan Lovell and Beth Wiltberger Ullum, The Ohio State University
Finding events that best connect families and their students to the university during Family Weekend can be challenging. With so many attendees and such large events, the feel of a tight-knit community can get lost. Ohio State has developed two lunches for specific family demographics that allow for students and families to celebrate who they are in the larger context of the university community. Through our Legacy Lunch and Distant Buckeye Out of State Lunch, we celebrate the diversity of our students while connecting them to being Buckeyes. This program will share how through creating connections, we are able to engage each of these family demographics with the Buckeye experience.

COMPELLING PARTNERSHIPS: EXPANDING ENGAGEMENT AND SUPPORT FOR FIRST-GENERATION FAMILIES Kayla Albano and Dr. Cynthia L. Alvarez, University of California - Los Angeles
Due to the presence of first generation and non-English speaking families in the university community and the understanding that family engagement positively influences college student success, it is imperative that colleges and universities provide resources for families to best support their students. This session will allow attendees to explore best practices and opportunities for expanding Parent & Family Programs services to include and increase support of first-generation and nonEnglish speaking families. Using existing research, including that of presenter Dr. Cynthia Alvarez, practices being developed at the University of California - Los Angeles, and collaborative goal development exercises, the presenters will lay out practical processes for growing program inclusivity and success.

CREATING A CULTURE OF FAMILY ENGAGEMENT
Jessica Fitzgerald and Danielle Cohen, University of South Florida
This session will discuss how practitioners can influence campus culture to engage family members in the success of their students. The presenters will share how their collaboration led to a change in dialogue across campus and led to a culture shift of a more inclusive environment for families. Those attending will gain an understanding of how this was accomplished, learn effective strategies they could implement on their own campuses, and participate in a discussion where ideas can be shared.

CREATING A REMARKABLE EXPERIENCE SO PARENTS BECOME YOUR BEST DONORS AND AMBASSADORS
Janice Nikkel, Trinity Western University
By creating a remarkable experience for your parents and families, and working closely with your Admissions and Development departments, you will gain rewards as your parents become some of your university’s best donors and ambassadors.

DIY: DESIGN FOR (YOU AND) YOUR OFFICE
Justin Smith, Georgetown University; Cecilia Grossberger, University of Arkansas
Does your office not have the staff or money to afford designers? Are you tired of using word for flyers? Is there a minor mistake you need to fix ASAP but don't know how to do it? If you are interested in learning how to design for your office (and for yourself) this session is for you. Become a Bold, Inspired designer in no time with our tips, tricks and shortcuts.

ENDING THE CYCLE OF EMAIL ANXIETY
Christine Self, Texas Tech University
What if someone told you that you only needed to check your email three times a day? If that sounds terrifying or impossible, this session is for you. While a powerful communication tool, email can also be source of anxiety, stress, and distraction. The presenter will share her perspectives about ending the stressful cycle of email informed by Jocelyn K. Glei’s (2016) book, Unsubscribe: How to Kill Email Anxiety, Avoid Distractions, and Get Real Work Done. The presentation will cover the science behind email anxiety, Glei’s strategies for managing email anxiety, and the presenter’s experiences in implementing and tweaking those strategies in her role as a parent programming professional. Participants will leave the session with an email routine tailored to their work environment, organization strategies to clear out a cluttered inbox, and a clear understanding of prioritizing when to read and answer emails.
Handout

ENGAGING PARENTS IN PHILANTHROPY: A UNIVERSITY/FOUNDATION PARTNERSHIP
Kelley Stier and Colton Withers (CFRE), Purdue University
Parents, particularly those who are not alumni of our institutions, represent a huge opportunity for market growth in our fundraising programs. These folks are at the height of their careers and are often looking for ways to stay involved in their child's education. At Purdue, we've created a comprehensive fundraising program partnering with the Foundation that has proven to be successful and impactful. This sessions will include success stories, lessons learned, and provide practical tips to implement.

ENHANCING YOUR ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR MODERN FAMILIES
Tess Gibson, Auburn University
Susan Doyle, Samford University
Dave Becker, CampusESP

Auburn University and Samford University recently deployed the CampusESP Parent Portal, an online tool for connecting with parents and families. Learn about what worked and what we would have done differently. We'll focus on roll-out strategies, parent content suggestions, building cross-campus partnerships, and meeting the needs of increasingly diverse parent and family populations.

EXTENDING OUTREACH, SIGNALING INCLUSION: PARTNERING TO ACHIEVE BILINGUAL FAMILY COMMUNICATIONS
Sharon Brownlow, Kennesaw State University
Liza Purvis, Collegiate Parent

Parent and family audiences are increasingly diverse yet most parent and family communications remain English only. With the specialist skills, time and costs involved to create and translate content for events, newsletters, websites and social media, many parent and family departments have reasonably concluded that providing extensive bilingual resources is out of reach. To change this paradigm, CollegiateParent developed solutions that make bilingual feasible and effective for universities, teams and budgets of all sizes. CollegiateParent works with leading universities on Spanish/English digital content packages, bilingual enewsletters and print publications. In this presentation, CollegiateParent and Kennesaw State University describe the decisionmaking and launch process, early feedback and lessons learned from Kennesaw State University’s new bilingual communications program. CollegiateParent will also showcase its content development process and the value these communications bring Spanish and English speaking First Generation families. CollegiateParent and Kennesaw State University suggest a simple path to bilingual communications for any university that wants to extend outreach and signal the value it places on inclusion.

FAMILY ONLINE ORIENTATION* 
Amber Jaynes and Amber Cardamone, University of Colorado Boulder
The University of Colorado Boulder launched a Family Online Orientation for the first time this summer. This new tool provided information for new families about resources that contributed to their students academic success and personal growth at CU Boulder. Come learn about what worked best, what did not, and what drove our decision to offer this new tool to families.

HAVE SUPPORT, WILL TRAVEL: WORKING WITH INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES
Meaghan Miller Thul, University of Minnesota
Ryan Lovell, The Ohio State University

Supporting the families of our international students requires strategic efforts and, oftentimes, a different approach. As international undergraduate students often have a lower sense of belonging, a more negative perception of campus climate and are less confident to assume leadership roles than their domestic counterparts, these students can pose a risk for campus satisfaction and retention. Initial efforts to address the needs of international students can begin before arrival to campus and continue throughout the first few months on campus. This presentation will highlight pre-departure orientation programs from Minnesota and Ohio State that focus on student outcomes while also engaging families in student success. Through leveraging valuable campus partnerships, crafting compelling messaging and understanding lessons learned, institutions of any size can learn how you might serve international students and families!

HOW TO ENGAGE AND COMMUNICATE WITH INTERNATIONAL AND STUDY ABROAD FAMILIES
Amy Swank and Richard Menard, Gonzaga University
The importance of preparing families of international students and families of students who study abroad to understand the unique nature of their students experience and how family support will be different within the international community is becoming increasingly important. This session will provide strategies, resources and communication plans for partnering with global engagement offices on college campus to support international families and families who will have students traveling abroad.

HOW TO PUT THE FUN IN FUNDRAISING!
Laci Weeden and Joan Roeber-Jones, Georgia Tech
We are constantly being asked to do more with less. Most campuses have limited staff and limited budgets. When resources are thinly stretched, we are required to think differently about how we accomplish our objectives. Traditionally, professionals in the field identify as either friendraisers or fundraisers, but can they be both? The Georgia Institute of Technology created a model several years ago that combines forces to carry the load by working collaboratively and creatively. The Director of Georgia Tech Parent & Family Programs and Director of Development for Parent Giving have developed a partnership which benefits each office and provides a unified program to support our constituents. Come learn how this model started, how it works, and what we would recommend to others.

IMAGINING PARENTS AS STUDENTS THEMSELVES: ONE ONLINE PROGRAM, TWO INSTITUTIONS
Amy Baldwin and Penny Hatfield, University of Central Arkansas
Laurie Hazard and Stephanie Carter, Bryant University

What happens when a university pilots an online program for parents? Do the parents “show up” and, more importantly, do they find helpful information to support their student? This presentation focuses on a public, Southern university and a private, Northeast university and their use of ParentLingo, an online program for parents, and how parents used it to enhance support for the students. The presenters will share how they each implemented the online program, marketed it through the university parent and families program, and how parents responded.

IMPORTANCE OF COLLABORATING WITH FAMILY MEMBERS OF A STUDENT WITH A DISABILITY
Adrienne Kravitz and Victoria Simon, Hofstra University
As students transition from high school to college, their family members must also undergo a transition. For families of a new college student with a disability, this transition may be more difficult than for families of their non-disabled peers. Collaborating with family members to set reasonable expectations can improve this transition and facilitate beneficial relationships. More reasonable expectation and information of what the institution can offer will allow family members to be more confident in their students’ ability to succeed. Empowering family members to help their students take ownership of their college experience will build confidence in both parties and lead to more positive interaction. While we, as professionals, are often reactive, proactive training will allow us to understand how to best serve our families of students with a disability.

IN THEIR OWN WORDS: PARENTS OF FIRST-GENERATION COLLEGE STUDENTS
Dawn Bruner, Ed.D., University of Rochester
Parents and family have a significant impact on the lives of students before college arrival and throughout their higher education experience. Many institutions are increasing efforts to engage special populations of students and families to promote student success. Yet, little is known about parents of some increasing populations, such as first-generation college students. This session will present findings of a doctoral research study. Attendees will gain a greater understanding of how parents of first generation college students define and practice involvement. Also, learn how institutions can enhance their relationship with parents of first-generation students, as well as, existing connections, disconnections, and barriers as reported by parent participants and parent and family program professionals. Implications of research and recommendations for higher education practice will be discussed.

INCORPORATING STUDENT LEADERS IN THE FAMILY EXPERIENCE
Paige Kegley, Clemson University
Laci Weeden, Georgia Tech
Kerri Fowler, NC State

Parent and Family Programs are understaffed on many campuses, while having a lot to get accomplished! Each university has its unique needs and goals. Come and learn how three institutions have come up with a way to encompass the energy of utilizing students in a variety of different efforts, with limited or no funding for these positions. Learn how these have been created to fulfill the offices unique needs, while benefitting both you, your students and families!

LIKE, ADD & FOLLOW: ENGAGING PARENTS AND FAMILIES THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGY
Alexandra Brown, University of California - Los Angeles
Branka Kristic, Hofstra University

This session will discuss how to effectively leverage social media and emerging technologies to engage with parents and family members -- a constituency group traditionally thought to be reluctant to engage in new mediums or online. The question is not whether or not parents use social media but how. The presenters will explain what communication methods work well with families and share lessons learned. In addition, the presenters will share how they use technology, including social media insights, in assessment.

MAKING BOLD STATEMENTS THROUGH REBRANDING
Albert Perera and Justin Inscoe, UNC-Chapel Hill
As the family structures of our students continue to diversify over time, we must evolve our services and offerings to meet their needs and, sometimes, we must make bold changes in doing so. Learn about how our office rebranded our identity, what challenges we faced, and what recommendations we have for those interested in doing the same.
Styleguide
Survey

MANAGING PARENT SOCIAL MEDIA AND BUILDING THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY
Sharon Bond and Jes Colebrook, PhD, University of Denver
Families of students represent unique subpopulations of the campus community who are craving information about university resources, cultures, academics, inclusion efforts, events, and the vast depth of institutional knowledge we possess. Through social media we have the opportunity like never before to increase the family’s access to those resources, to provide information and build community. Social media allows families to feel valued, have their own special community of peers and a support system that is more than university staff. But how do we do that? What should we expect? This session will provide tools to manage a parent social media platform, making decisions about developing social media for subpopulations of parents, and becoming comfortable with taking on the unknown outcomes.

NO DIFFICULT PARENTS: STRATEGIES FOR COMMUNICATION AND SELF-CARE
Branka Kristic and John C. Guthman, Ph.D., Hofstra University
The majority of our interactions with families are joyous, positive and gratifying. However, we all know those stressful situations, including campus crises, when we field angry or abusive calls and interact with upset family members. Learn strategies on how to work professionally in emotional situations, deescalate conflicts and, at the same time, care for yourself. In addition, the presenters will suggest how we may educate family members on their own self-care as their parental role changes on the college level.

PARENT AND FAMILY FACEBOOK GROUPS: THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY
Maureen Hurley and Sharon Duffy, Emerson College
Facebook is undeniably a fabulous forum for communicating with families and creating community. However, when a discussion turns contentious, when misinformation is proliferated, or when sensitive personal information is disseminated, Parent and Family Programs or another administrative office must intervene. Examples from our experience will be shared and we encourage participants to bring examples and strategies for successful management of their own family Facebook groups.

PRODUCTIVITY (AND SURVIVAL) IN THE ONE-PERSON OFFICE
Shari Glaser, Western Michigan University
So you don’t have a staff? An assistant? A support person? Student employees? Ah yes…the responsibilities (and loneliness) of the one-person office can be overwhelming and daunting – especially with a limited budget. During this session, I will share my experience in successfully facilitating a one-person Family Engagement office for the past 10 years and the resulting impact on the University’s strategic priorities and relationship-building with families. We will explore ways to engage families effectively; building institutional affinity, how to work efficiently, and how to forge partnerships with colleagues that give our families the illusion (and reassurance) of a fleet of people behind the scenes meeting their every need.
Recommendations

SUPPORTING FAMILIES OF 1ST GENERATION STUDENTS
Libby Daggers, Texas A&M University
This presentation will review strategies used by New Student & Family Programs (NSFP) at Texas A&M to enhance support and resources for family members of 1st Generation College Students. After conducting data analysis on our families attending orientation, we identified way to further support and bridge the gap of the families of our 1st Generation students. Through enhanced programming, community events, and targeted communication we are able to better integrate these families into our community and equip them the tools necessary to support their student. The session will give an overview of implementation, strategic partners, and assessment and allow for discussion on implementing similar programs at other institutions.

STRATEGIES FOR ENGAGING STAKEHOLDERS IN MEANINGFUL WAYS
Tess Gibson, Auburn University
Bridget Riordan, Emory
Shannon Cantlay, University of Texas at Austin

Success with stakeholders plays an important role in the operational functions of Parent and Family Programs. Many offices serve as the liaison from parents and families to the institution they serve, but have a difficult time finding partnerships and creating these relationships. This presentation highlights three various-sized institutions that yield successful results to further reach those invested in their programs.

THIS IS (NOT?) A DRILL: CRISIS COMMUNICATION & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
Allison S. Dodson, Appalachian State University
Arie Gee, University of Florida

As much as we wish our campuses could exist in a bubble that is immune to crisis, this just is not the reality. While we do not have control over how or when crisis occurs, we do have control over how we communicate with parents and family members. This session will discuss methods and strategies for communicating with families during a campus crisis situation. The focus of this session will be two-fold: tips for communicating with parents on incidents and safety concerns as they arise, and information for developing an off-site Emergency Response Center to receive parents/families in the event of a large-scale disaster.
Handout

UNEXPECTED BENEFITS OF STRATEGIC PLANNING WITH PARENT VOLUNTEERS: A BOLD UNDERTAKING
Cyndy Hill, Penn State
In the spring of 2016, the Penn State Parents Council began a year-long strategic planning process. Working remotely and creating opportunities for the 45-member council provided challenges during the process, but the unexpected benefits outweighed the challenges. While the main benefit included a completed strategic plan, discovering the talents and expertise of council members and the personal connections made within the group were wonderfully unexpected.
Article
Worksheet

USING PROJECT MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE TO FACILITATE TEAMWORK, COLLABORATION, AND LEARNING FOR STAFF AND STUDENTS
Lindsey Bray and Kyle Capstick, University of Memphis
Our teams may range in size from large to small but in all team settings it is crucial that all members are able to communicate effectively and work together to ensure that events, projects and goals are completed. This session will demonstrate how teams can utilize project management tools to facilitate an environment that ensures clear objectives, encourages collaboration and creates learning opportunities for staff and students to better use time and resources.

WHEN TRAGEDY STRIKES: HEALING AND ACTION AFTER A CAMPUS CRISIS
Brian Watkins, University of Maryland
Cyndy Hill, Penn State University

In February 2017, Penn State University (PSU) was rattled by the hazing death of one of its students and the subsequent criminal charges against 18 student members of the fraternity. Then in May, a student at the University of Maryland (UMD) murdered a visiting student from Bowie State University on the UMD campus. These violent deaths left these institutions grappling with important issues and difficult conversations related to Greek life, alcohol use, racism, community standards, and much more. The directors of the PSU and UMD parent/family offices will share insights and lessons learned about other-care, self-care, and moving forward in the face of immeasurable tragedy on their campuses.

WHERE ARE WE GOING? CRAFTING AND IMPLEMENTING A FAMILY NEEDS ASSESSMENT 
Justin Inscoe and Albert Pererra, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Creating and expanding new family programming is no easy task, especially when budgets are limited. With a new position in the office, we expanded bandwidth to create new family program offerings, but determining what to implement was the next natural question. Presenters will tell their story of creating and administering a Family Experience Survey to determine the experiences so far, and the interests of families in which we hope to serve better in the future. Participants will learn what service was used to create the survey, see what questions were finalized to gather information, and explore methods for making meaning of the data.

*Presentation not available for download. Please contact the presenter for more information.